inspireindeed

Inspire Indeed radio series highlighting anti-violence work and programs in October

During October, in support of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the co-hosts of Inspire Indeed (facebook) will be focusing on highlighting anti-violence agencies. Tune on Tuesdays at 12:00 pm EST in October on WRIR 97.3 FM (or streamed at wrir.org) will be focusing on highlighting anti-violence agencies.

roofies

The V Word – Roofies (podcast aired on WRIR 97.3)

Welcome to today’s edition of The V Word.

You can listen to the episode here 

September is National Recovery Month and this month I am going to focus on the use of alcohol or other drugs to facilitate sexual assault.
I am sure most of you have heard about the students at North Carolina State University who are inventing a nail polish that changes color when it comes into contact with, what are commonly called, date rape drugs.
The term “date-rape drugs” is used to identify Rohypnol, Xanax, and GHB. Do you know what these are exactly?
Rohypnol is the brand name for a drug in the same family as Valium and Xanax. It is a fast-acting sedative. However, it has a side effect that produces memory loss while using the drug.
GHB is gamma-hydroxybutyrate and also produces memory loss while under it’s influence.
Both these drugs dissolve easily, are colorless and oderless. These drugs are used to sedate a person who may not be able to recall what happened under the influence.
Alone, GHB can produce intense drowsiness, confusion, nausea, dizziness, disorientation, vomiting, seizures, respiratory depression, and reduced or loss of consciousness in as little as 10-20 minutes after ingestion. However, when mixed with alcohol, GHB can be extremely lethal. Coma and death are fairly common in overdoses. The effects of GHB can last up to 3-6 hours. GHB is dangerous for several reasons including the ones listed above. One of the main dangers is that it takes so little of it to produce a big effect. Just 2 grams can induce a coma-like sleep where intubation is the only means to wake the user.
What are the street names for GHB: Grievous Bodily Harm, Liquid X, Liquid E, Liquid Ecstasy, Easy Lay, G, Vita G, Georgia Home Boy, G-Juice, Great Hormones, Somatomax, Bedtime Scoop, Soap, Gook, Gamma 10, Energy Drink, Salt Water, Liquid Dust, Cherry Meth, Fantasy, Organic Quaalude, and Sleep 500.
Rohypnol can produce drowsiness, confusion, motor skill impairment, dizziness, disorientation, impaired judgment, and reduced or loss of consciousness in as little as 20-30 minutes after ingestion. However, when mixed with alcohol, Rohypnol can be even more dangerous. There may be extremely low blood pressure, respiratory depression, coma, or death. Since Rohypnol is a sedative like alcohol, the two together can be lethal.
Since it is illegal in the US, it is often smuggled into the country from Mexico, Canada, and Europe. It is primarily sent through the US Postal Service, commercial delivery services, and smuggled by individuals. It is classed as a Schedule III federally controlled substance although 8 states have reclassified it as a Schedule I controlled substance.
What are some of Rohypnol’s street names? Ruffies, Roofies, Rophies, Roches, Roaches, La Rochas, Rope, Rib, Forget Pill, Pingus, R2, Reynolds, Row-shay, Roach 2, Wolfies, Trip-and-Fall, Poor Man’s Quaalude, Whiteys, Mind Erasers, Mexican Valium, Lunch Money, Circles, and Roopies.
Notice the street names? Notice how they actually identify what the drugs are used for?
How do you know if you may have been drugged and then assaulted? Many victims report waking up and not knowing how they got home, finding their clothing on inside out or incorrectly or missing items, not remembering the end of a party or event. They may feel have wounds or injuries they cannot account for.
These drugs can show up on a drug test following a sexual assault but only in the person goes to a hospital and requests a test within 24 hours.
What can you do if you think you have been drugged?
get to a safe place and call someone you trust.
get to a hospital emergency room immediately. – Remember mixed with alcohol these drugs can be fatal or induce coma.
notifiy law enforcement.
call a rape crisis center
If you decide to file a report – do not shower, bathe, douche, change clothes, or brush your teeth until medical and legal evidence can be collected. Get to a hospital or clinic to receive treatment for any internal/external injuries (whether or not you see any – they may be undetectable to you), testing for pregnancy or STD’s, treatment for pregnancy or STD’s, and to receive support. Request a urine test to detect the presence of drugs as soon as possible.

A new invention developed by students at North Carolina State University has been highlighted in the press and social media this week: a nail polish, called “Undercover Colors,” that changes color when it comes into contact with date-rape drugs. You just have to stir your drink with your finger and if the nail polish changes color, it signals a problem.
The marketing behind the new product is “The First Fashion Company Empowering Women To Prevent Sexual Assault.”
While there is debate of whether this is just another means for women to have to prevent sexual assault on themselves, it does provide an intervention tool. Until society catches up that preventing sexual assault is not the responsibility of women or the victim, we continue to need tools like these that can help identify if you are being drugged. That is of course if you wear nail polish.

How can you help?
Get involved with your local rape crisis center and addictive recovery center to join a group or service that is available or help create one.
For help or information? Here are some options…
If you have been assaulted, call 911. Local rape crisis centers have advocates they can send to help support you and provide information.
For information on how to report an assault in the Richmond, Virginia, USA are, you can call the non-emergency line at 804-646-5100 or go by a local police station office. The main Richmond office is located at 200 West Grace Street.
To get a forensic exam to collect evidence and receive medical care, the local hospitals in the Richmond area with Forensic Nurse Examiners are at Medical College of Virginia and St. Mary’s Hospital.
For help with counseling and advocacy, local rape crisis centers, child advocacy centers and domestic violence shelters can provide services. To find a center closest to you… you can call the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238. That is the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238.
Want to share a story or ask a question? Email me at thevword.radio@gmail.com or tweet me at my twitter account: @preventviolence. You can read the transcript for this show and past shows on my blog at http://www.thevword.org
The V Word is recorded in the studios of WRIR-LP 97.3 and streamed at wrir.org, read and produced by Carol Olson. Production support is provided by Jennifer Gallienne. Music was created by The Etching Tin

RP: Toolkit for Adolescent Relationship Abuse – integrating into PREP

Hello all I thought I would pass this along: 

The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) created a toolkit for integrating Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) components into PREP. This toolkit has lived on the limited-access Communities of Practice website.
The toolkit has recently been added to the National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth for everyone/anyone to access.
Toolkit to incorporate Adolescent Relationship Abuse Prevention into organizations and programs :
http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/toolkit-incorporate-adolescent-relationship-abuse-prevention-existing-adolescent-pregnancy?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ncfynews
Components include:

* 1. Organizational Readiness and Planning<http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/readiness-planning>
* 2. Selection and Adaptation of Materials to Address ARA<http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/selection-adaptation>
* 3. Preparation for Implementation<http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/preparation-implementation>
* 4. Monitoring and Evaluation <http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/monitoring-evaluation>
* References<http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/references>
* Appendix: Additional Information and Research about Adolescent Relationship Abuse<http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/features/ara-toolkit/appendix>

Originally posted on VDHSV list serve by: 

Mandy Paradise, M.Ed.
Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) Project Coordinator
Access, Systems and Coordination
Office of Healthy Communities
Division of Prevention and Community Health
Washington State Department of Health
Ph: (360) 236-3538<tel:%28360%29%20236-3538> | E: mandy.paradise@doh.wa.gov<mailto:mandy.paradise@doh.wa.gov>
Mail: P.O. Box 47880
Olympia, WA 98504-7880
Location: Point Plaza East – 310 Israel Road S.E.
Tumwater, WA 98501
Public Health – Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington

SA-on-College-Campus

The V Word: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

August 25, 2014

Welcome to today’s edition of The V Word.

You can listen to the episode here: https://soundcloud.com/carol-ann-olson/08-25-2014-the-v-word-campus-sexual-assault

It is time for students to return to college campuses and there has been a lot in the news lately about sexual assault at universities and the ability of school officials to respond appropriately.
Like most survivors of interpersonal crime, I have many stories and one is from college. I broke up with someone and he came to my apartment and assaulted me. I moved into that apartment after we broke up and to my knowledge had not been there. I was wrong, he started a relationship with my roommate by providing her with drugs and talked her into nailing the windows shut in my room one day. That is the day he assaulted me. When he walked into my apartment using a key she had given him, I tried to run to my room to get out a window but they were nailed shut. My neighbors heard me screaming but did not help because they were so used to seeing him there and hearing noise, while he was visiting my roommate. I little recourse with the law because he had a key and my roommate was using drugs and the court linked that to me. Most notable in this scene is that he used my roommate. That is how premeditated it was and he made sure my neighbors were used to him.

My assault on a college campus happened many years ago. While many gains have been made since then, much is still needed. The public, including school officials do not seem to realize how offenders behave. He did this again, to another girl. He escalated his actions, hurting her physically more and adding some very sick behavior. She was a bright premed student and dropped out of school. I transferred because he would not leave me alone and continued stalking me afterward as he only got a restriction to stay 50 feet away from me. Which he did, everyday, everywhere I went.

In their article: Sexual Assault on College Campuses: A Culture of Indifference. Investigative West journalists Carol Smith and Lee van der Voo illustrate a culture of indifference and denial that results in one in five young women being sexually assaulted during their college years. (Note that other sites state that the statistics are one in four). For victims of sexual assault at colleges, Smith and van der Voo found many colleges and universities have unclear and conflicted internal disciplinary systems that not only provide no help to victims of assault but actually can compound their suffering. These fragmented system often result in victims delaying reporting and delay seeking help. Smith and van der Voo found that discipline for the alleged perpetrators was light or nonexistent. This results in students who are assaulted being left to bear the emotional, physical and financial consequences, while those they hold responsible was away.

What can you do?
PACT5 (found at pact5.org) is a national movement to prevent sexual assaults and rapes in colleges. The PACT5 project uses documentary form, produced by students, to create powerful stories. Their goal is to change potentially tragic behavior patterns. they believe that students are the ones who can make a difference in the minds of other students.

If you are sexually assaulted:

  • Get to a safe place away from your perpetrator as soon as possible.
  • Call your local rape crisis center or victim service agency if you would like to obtain an advocate. Advocates may be present during any medical, police, or legal meeting. Advocates can help you navigate the medical and criminal justice systems as well as provide information and support.
  • If you are unsure of local resources, the Rape Abuse and Incest National Network has phone and online hotlines available 24 hours a day -www.RAINN.org | 1-800-656-HOPE
  • Seek medical attention – even if no outward injuries exist, it is recommended that are examined by a medical professional. Forensic exams are done by specially trained nurses in the emergency room and are free for victims of sexual assault. (They do not have to go through the victim’s insurance.) Exams may preserve crucial evidence should you choose to report, though reporting to police is not necessary in order to have an exam completed. You can further preserve evidence by not bathing, washing your hands, eating, or smoking until the forensic exam has been completed.
  • Consider reporting to the police and/or your university.

How can you help?

Get involved with your local rape crisis center to learn more about sexual assault on college universities and get involved with your college to join a group or service that is available or help create one. Many programs for sexual assault on college campuses are located either through the student health center or the judicial services.

For help or information? Here are some options…

If you have been assaulted or your child has been assaulted, call 911. Local rape crisis centers and child advocacy centers have advocates they can send to help support you and provide information.

For information on how to report an assault in the Richmond, Virginia, USA area, you can call the non-emergency line at 804-646-5100 or go by a local police station office. The main Richmond office is located at 200 West Grace Street.

To get a forensic exam to collect evidence and receive medical care, the local hospitals in the Richmond area with Forensic Nurse Examiners are at Medical College of Virginia and St. Mary’s Hospital.

For help with counseling and advocacy, local rape crisis centers, child advocacy centers and domestic violence shelters can provide services. To find a center closest to you… you can call the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238. That is the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238.

Want to share a story or ask a question? Email me at thevword.radio@gmail.com or tweet me at my twitter account: @preventviolence. You can read the transcript for this show and past shows on my blog at www.thevword.org

The V Word is recorded in the studios of WRIR-LP 97.3 and streamed at wrir.org, read and produced by Carol Olson with production support by Jennifer Gallienne. Music is provided by the Etching Tin.

technologystalking

The V Word: Stalking and Technology

Welcome to today’s edition of The V Word.

You can listen to the episode here:

Last week I talked about predation via technology and the Internet.

A reader wrote in sharing her story about her partner stalking her using technology and asked for information.
Abusers often engage in controlling behavior to limit a person’s access to friends, family and information. Limiting the use of technology is one way of controlling a person and using technology to monitor and stalk a person is becoming more frequent the more technology is used to communicate. Abusers will monitor telephone calls and letters and engage in stalking to track their victim’s location. As technology has expanded, so do the tools to frighten, monitor, and control their victims.
Here are somethings to consider that can happen.

  • Someone can monitor your computer use without you knowing it.
  • A “history” cannot be completely erased from your computer.
  • Your cell phone use can be monitored.
  • A global positioning system (GPS) can be placed on your car, in your purse or in your cell phone to track you.
  • Did you know that e-mail is like a postcard and can be intercepted.

The New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence has provided some great tips on Computer Safety

  • Your Internet browser keeps a record of the Web sites you have visited. It is easy to go back and see what sites the previous user has looked at. This may be of concern to you if you’d like to keep the sites you are looking at confidential. Many browser types have features that display recently visited sites.
  • If you are in danger, please try to use a safer computer that someone abusive does not have direct or remote (hacking) access to.
  • If you think your activities are being monitored, they probably are. Abusive people are often controlling and want to know your every move. You don’t need to be a computer programmer or have special skills to monitor someone’s computer and Internet activities – anyone can do it and there are many ways to monitor with programs like Spyware, keystroke loggers and hacking tools.
  • Spyware can be installed easily and is hard to detect. Every key stroke or web page viewed is recorded and seen by your abuser.

It is not possible to delete or clear all the “footprints” of your computer or online activities. If you are being monitored, it may be dangerous to change your computer behaviors such as suddenly deleting your entire internet history if that is not your regular habit. If you still wish to delete your internet history, please contact your local crisis center or call the NH Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence at 603-224-8893 for information on how to do this.

Email and Instant/Text Messaging (IM) are not safe or confidential ways to talk to someone about the danger or abuse in your life. If possible, please call a hotline instead. If you use email or IM, please use a safer computer and an account your abuser does not know about. It might be safer to use a computer in a public library, at a community technology center (CTC), at a trusted friend’s house, or an Internet Café.

Additional Technology Tips:

  • Remember that “corded” phones are more private and less interceptable than cordless phones or analog cell phones.
  • e aware you may not be able to reach 911 using an Internet phone or Internet-based phone service. So you may need to be prepared to use another phone to call 911. Contact your local domestic violence program, shelter, or rape crisis center to learn about free cell phone donation programs.
  • If you receive harassing emails, save them as evidence.
  • Use a web-based email service like Gmail, Yahoo or Hotmail.
  • Choose passwords that are not easy to guess and change passwords often. Do not let your computer save your passwords.
  • Keep your files on a removable disk and put passwords on them to deter access.
  • Be sure your surfing history remains as confidential as possible.
  • You need to make sure that the “Use Inline Autocomplete” box is NOT checked. This function will complete a partial web address while typing a location in the address bar at the top of the browser. If you feel that it is safe to do so, you can disable the auto complete for your web browser.
    Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer have instructions on how to do this.

What can you do?

In Virginia there are many laws to protect children. You can find them at the Department of Criminial Justice Services website:

http://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/juvenile/resources/childabusestatutes/index.cfm

How can you help?

Get involved with your local rape crisis center to learn more about internet safety.

For help or information? Here are some options…

  • If you have been assaulted or your child has been assaulted, call 911. Local rape crisis centers and child advocacy centers have advocates they can send to help support you and provide information.
  • For information on how to report an assault in the Richmond, Virginia, USA are, you can call the non-emergency line at 804-646-5100 or go by a local police station office. The main Richmond office is located at 200 East Grace Street.
  • To get a forensic exam to collect evidence and receive medical care, the local hospitals in the Richmond area with Forensic Nurse Examiners are at Medical College of Virginia and St. Mary’s Hospital.
  • For help with counseling and advocacy, local rape crisis centers, child advocacy centers and domestic violence shelters can provide services. To find a center closest to you… you can call the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238. That is the Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-838-8238.
  • Want to share a story or ask a question? Email me at thevword.radio@gmail.com or tweet me at my twitter account: @preventviolence. You can read the transcript for this show and past shows on my blog at www.thevword.org

The V Word is recorded in the studios of WRIR-LP 97.3 and streamed at wrir.org, read and produced by me, Carol Olson. Music is provided by the Etching Tin

More Resources:

  • “Intimate Partner Violence, Technology, and Stalking” : This article describes a broad range of technologies in intimate partner stalking, including cordless and cellular telephones, fax machines, e-mail, internet-based harassment, global positioning systems, spy ware, video cameras, and online databases.
  • The Safety Net Project at the National Network to End Domestic Violence
  • Stalking Resource Center at the National Center for Victims of Crime
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline
  • CyberAngels
  • Women Halting Online Abuse (WHOA)
  • Safety Ed International
  • Online Privacy Alliance
  • Electronic Privacy Information Center
  • Privacy Rights Clearinghouse
  • Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Affairs Department

Bellevue Brings It To End Domestic Violence

The Businesses of Bellevue are joining together to raise awareness in the cause to end violence against women and children and raise funds for local anti-violence shelters.  All through the month of October, 2014 businesses will be donating funds or service to help survivors of violence. Check here for up-to-date information.  

  • Mondays at the Mill – The Mill is giving 10% of proceeds every Monday in October to benefit services for Domestic Violence.  Come eat a great meal, pick up some information and support domestic violence services for our community.  
  • The Eclectic Cottage is hosting a discussion group. (Date to be announced) 

_____________________________________________________________________

The YWCA of Richmond 

We strengthen our community by creating and advancing opportunities to empower women, children, and families to live their best lives.

http://ywcarichmond.org/dv/   Regional Hotline: 804-612-6126

reveal-read-for-pixels-slide

“READ FOR PIXELS” 2014 CAMPAIGN TO FEATURE BESTSELLING AUTHORS RAISING FUNDS & AWARENESS FOR THE CAUSE TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

Media Contact: Regina Yau – info@thepixelproject.net / pixelprojectteam@gmail.com

PRE-CAMPAIGN ANNOUNCEMENT:

“READ FOR PIXELS” 2014 CAMPAIGN TO FEATURE BESTSELLING AUTHORS RAISING FUNDS & AWARENESS FOR THE CAUSE TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

AUGUST 12th, 2014 (WORLDWIDE): The Pixel Project (www.thepixelproject.net), an anti-Violence Against Women non-profit, will be holding the first “Read For Pixels” 2014 Google Hangout Sessions featuring live Google Hangouts with award-winning bestselling authors in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign (http://reveal.thepixelproject.net), which aims to raise US$1 million in aid of The Pixel Project and the USA’s National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (www.ncadv.org). Participating authors include Joe Hill, Ellen Hopkins, Robert J. Sawyer, Cinda Williams Chima, Chuck Wendig, Kevin Hearne, Delilah S. Dawson, Alyson Noel, Jasper Fforde, Sarah J. Maas and G. Willow Wilson.

The “Read For Pixels” Google Hangout sessions will run on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evenings throughout September. Each session will feature an author reading from one of their books and discussing why they support ending violence against women, their writing, and women in the media and popular culture. Each session will also include a live moderated Q&A session for fans and book lovers to ask their favourite authors questions in real time.

Participating authors have also generously donated a range of exclusive “goodies” to help The Pixel Project encourage fans and book lovers to donate to the Pixel Reveal campaign including: 1-to-1 Skype chats for fans and book clubs, signed first editions or special editions of participating author books, brand-new Drabbles (100-word stories), a handwritten short story or poem on a postcard, and more. Additional goodies are donated by Bloomsbury Books and Romance author Lori Foster. Donations begin at as little as US$10 and the goodies are available to donors as “thank you” gifts depending on the donation amount. Fundraising will take place throughout September.

“Violence against women is one of the most widespread and entrenched human rights violations in the world and The Pixel Project is delighted that so many acclaimed authors have stepped up to join us in raising much-needed funds and widespread support for this cause,” said Regina Yau, Founder and President of The Pixel Project. “It is our hope that their support of the cause to end violence against women will inspire fans of their wonderful books and book lovers worldwide to not only donate generously, but also begin taking action to stop the violence in their communities wherever they are in the world.”

More information about Read For Pixels can be found at: http://is.gd/Read4Pixels2014.

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About The Pixel Project (www.thepixelproject.net)
The Pixel Project is a complete virtual, volunteer-led global 501(c)3 nonprofit organisation whose mission is to raise awareness, funds and volunteer power for the cause to end violence against women using a combination of social media, new technologies, and popular culture/the Arts. Their flagship initiative is the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign which aims to turbo-charge global awareness about VAW using social media while raising US$1 million by getting a global audience to collectively unveil a million-pixel mystery collage of Celebrity Male Role Models at US$1 per pixel.