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Ways to Support Stalking Awareness Month – #12

Hold a candlelight vigil to honor victims killed following stalking.  There is a link between stalking behavior and increased risk of death.   The Stalking Resource Center released statistics that identify

  • 76% of intimate partner femicide victims have been stalked by their intimate partner.
  • 67% had been physically abused by their intimate partner.
  • 89% of femicide victims who had been physically assaulted had also been stalked in the 12 months before their murder.
  • 79% of abused femicide victims reported being stalked during the same period that they were abused.
  • 54% of femicide victims reported stalking to police before they were killed by their stalkers.

More than 13 percent of women report having been stalked in college. Eighty-one percent of victims who were stalked by an intimate partner also report physical abuse. And 54 percent of female murder victims reported stalking to police before their stalkers killed them – while 76 percent of all those murdered were stalked at least once in the 12 months prior to their death.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/10/08/stalking-campuses-major-issue-expert-says-clery-event#ixzz2ISTXKnXY

 

Donate Stalking Education and Prevention Curriculum Programs to local schools, churches, rape crisis and domestic violence centers.

Some Resources: 

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention – Second Step: A Violence Prevention Program

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention – Violence Prevention Curriculum for Adolescents 

Peace Over Violence – In Touch with Teens

Ways to Support Stalking Awareness Month #9 – subscribe to journals to keep educated

Subscribe to local blogs or journals to get regular information on stalking and interpersonal violence in your community.

The Source: Stalking in the News

OVW Blog

SafetyWeb – a site about cyber stalking

In Virginia:

Joining the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance provides you with a subscription to their journal: Revolution

Ways to support Stalking Awareness in your community #7 – Learn about it.

Learn about the history of National Stalking Awareness Month.  “In January 2004, the National Center for Victims of Crime launched National Stalking Awareness Month (NSAM) to increase the public’s understanding of the crime of stalking. NSAM emerged from the work of the Stalking Resource Center, a National Center program funded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice, to raise awareness about stalking and help develop and implement multidisciplinary responses to the crime.   Read more about the history by the National Stalking Awareness Month. org.

Read the Stalking Fact Sheet for more information on statistics of stalking and it’s relation to other interpersonal crime.

 

Ways to Support Stalking Awareness in Your Community #4 – Appreciation

Are there programs or individuals in your community who has worked to stop stalking or raise awareness?  Recognize those folks for their very important work whether public officials, community members, law enforcement officials, non-profit workers, or volunteers–anyone in your community who has worked to stop stalking–with a certificate of appreciation.

Stalking Awareness Month has a a sample certificate you can download and use:

Certificates of Appreciation

Contact your local radio/TV stations and ask them to air some short Public Service Announcements (PSA)

National Stalking Awareness Month.org has some Sample Public Service Announcements for you to use:
Public service announcements (PSAs), brief on-air messages, can reach millions of potential NSAM supporters. Contact the public service departments at local radio and
TV stations, and ask if they will air your PSA. Offer them the sample PSAs below, which can be used as “live-copy” scripts for an announcer to read on the air or for the
station to adapt for its own PSA. Remember to include your organization’s local contact information in your PSA.
15-second PSA:
Did you know stalking affected 6.6 million Americans in one year? Stalking is a dangerous crime that can happen to anyone. If you or someone you know is being
stalked, contact [Name of Organization] at [phone number], or visit [website].
30-second PSA:
Imagine that you don’t feel safe. Someone is following you, texting and e-mailing you, and you are afraid. In one year, 6.6 million Americans were victims of stalking—a
dangerous crime that can happen to anyone. If you or anyone you know is being stalked, or to find out more about stalking, contact [Name of Organization] at [phone number], or visit [website].

Ways to Support Stalking Awareness in your community #3 – Tweet about it!

31 Days of Status Updates

Each day in January you can help raise awareness about stalking. Just use one of the suggested messages
for your social networking site status update, your tweet, or your Instant Message (IM) away message. If
you’re tweeting, add #NSAM to the end of the tweet!  Stalking Awareness Month.org has a sheet of suggestions for you.  Just copy and post!

January 1, 2013 – January is National Stalking Awareness Month. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 2, 2013 – Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.
January 3, 2013 – What are you doing to recognize National Stalking Awareness Month? Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 4, 2013 – Stalking is a crime that is pervasive, dangerous, and potentially lethal. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 5, 2013 – 6.6 million people are stalked each year in the United States. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 6, 2013 – What would you say to a friend who told you they were being stalked? Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 7, 2013 – It’s not a joke. It’s not romantic. It’s not ok. Stop stalking. It’s a crime. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 8, 2013 – Although women are more likely to be stalked than men, anyone can be a victim of stalking. Visit http://bit.ly/srcncvc for more info.
January 9, 2013 – 1 in 4 women and 1 in 13 men will be victims of stalking in their lifetime. Visit http://bit.ly/srcncvc for more info.
January 10, 2013 – Stalking is a crime. Do you know what your state stalking law says? Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 11, 2013 – Would you report it if you were being stalked? Most victims don’t. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 12, 2013 – Stalking is often treated as a joke or “not that big of a deal.” Why do you think that is? Visit http://bit.ly/srcncvc for more info.
January 13, 2013 – What services are available for stalking victims in your community? Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.
January 14, 2013 – Intimate partner stalking is the most common type of stalking and the most dangerous. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 15, 2013 – Try this: Google “track girlfriend” and see how many sites tell someone how to stalk. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 16, 2013 – Phones, computers, GPS, and cameras are some of  the common forms of technology used by stalkers.

January 17, 2013 – What messages about stalking are in the media? Tweet us what you see. For examples: http://bit.ly/SCLtVn

January 18, 2013 – Rates of stalking among college students are higher than the general public. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 19, 2013 – How young can stalking behavior start? Do you see stalking behaviors among high school students? Middle school students? Younger?

January 20, 2013 – Most stalking victims know their stalker. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 21, 2013 – “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

January 22, 2013 – Stalkers often reoffend; recidivism rates are as high as 60%. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.                                                                       

January 23, 2013 – Behaviors that may seem benign to you or me may be terrorizing to a stalking victim. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 24, 2013 – Stalking can affect a victim’s emotional, physical, and economic well-being. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.

January 25, 2013 – Most alarmingly, stalking also can be lethal. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.    

January 26, 2013 – Stalkers often access information about victims that is available online. Do you know what information about you is online?                                              

January 27, 2013 – Victims of stalking are encouraged to keep a log of all stalking behaviors including emails, texts & phone messages.                                                         

January 28, 2013 – It is important to consider how to victims may be harmed by stalkers’ use of technology. Visit http://bit.ly/srcncvc for more info.                          

January 29, 2013 – The majority of stalking victims report losing time from work as well as income because of the stalking.                                                                                 

January 30, 2013 – Stalking: Know it. Name it. Stop it. Visit stalkingawarenessmonth.org for more info.                                                                                                                             

January 31, 2013 – How will you continue your efforts to raise awareness about stalking throughout the year? Visit http://bit.ly/srcncvc for more info.

Stalking: Know It, Name It, Stop It

January is National Stalking Awareness Month, a time to focus on a crime that affects 6.6 million victims a year.

While legal definitions of stalking vary from one jurisdiction to another, a good working definition of stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

STALKING VICTIMIZATION

• 6.6 million people are stalked in one year in the United States.
• 1 in 6 women and 1 in 19 men have experienced stalking victimization at some point during their lifetime in which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed. Using a less conservative definition of stalking, which considers any amount of fear (i.e., a little fearful, somewhat fearful, or very fearful), 1 in 4 women and 1 in 13 men reported being a victim of stalking in their lifetime.
• The majority of stalking victims are stalked by someone they know. 66% of female victims and 41% of male victims of stalking are stalked by a current or former intimate partner.
• More than half of female victims and more than 1/3 of male victims of stalking indicated that they were stalked before the age of 25.
• About 1 in 5 female victims and 1 in 14 male victims experienced stalking between the ages of 11 and 17. [Michele C. Black et al., “The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Summary Report,” (Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011).]
• 46% of stalking victims experience at least one unwanted contact per week.
• 11% of stalking victims have been stalked for 5 years or more. [Katrina Baum et al., “Stalking Victimization in the United States,” (Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2009).]

STALKING AND INTIMATE PARTNER FEMICIDE

• 76% of intimate partner femicide victims have been stalked by their intimate partner.
• 67% had been physically abused by their intimate partner.
• 89% of femicide victims who had been physically assaulted had also been stalked in the 12 months before their murder.
• 79% of abused femicide victims reported being stalked during the same period that they were abused.
• 54% of femicide victims reported stalking to police before they were killed by their stalkers.
[Judith McFarlane et al., “Stalking and Intimate Partner Femicide,” Homicide Studies 3, no. 4 (1999).]

RECON STUDY OF STALKERS

• 2/3 of stalkers pursue their victims at least once per week, many daily, using more than one method.
• 78% of stalkers use more than one means of approach.
• Weapons are used to harm or threaten victims in 1 out of 5 cases.
• Almost 1/3 of stalkers have stalked before.
• Intimate partner stalkers frequently approach their targets, and their behaviors escalate quickly. [Kris Mohandie et al.,“The RECON Typology of Stalking: Reliability and Validity Based upon a Large Sample of North American Stalkers,” Journal of Forensic Sciences, 51, no. 1 (2006).]

IMPACT OF STALKING ON VICTIMS

• 46% of stalking victims fear not knowing what will happen next.
• 29% of stalking victims fear the stalking will never stop.
• 1 in 8 employed stalking victims lose time from work as a result of their victimization and more than half lose 5 days of work or more.
• 1 in 7 stalking victims move as a result of their victimization. [Baum et al.]
• The prevalence of anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction, and severe depression is much higher among stalking victims than the general population, especially if the stalking involves being followed or having one’s property destroyed. [Eric Blauuw et al., “The Toll of Stalking,” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17, no. 1 (2002):50-63.]

STALKING LAWS

• Stalking is a crime under the laws of 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Territories, and the Federal government.
• Less than 1/3 of states classify stalking as a felony upon first offense.
• More than 1/2 of states classify stalking as a felony upon second or subsequent offense or when the crime involves aggravating factors.
• Aggravating factors may include: possession of a deadly weapon, violation of a court order or condition of probation/parole, victim under 16 years, or same victim as prior occasions.
For a compilation of state, tribal, and federal laws visit www.victimsofcrime.org/src.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The mission of the Stalking Resource Center is to enhance the ability of professionals, organizations, and systems to effectively respond to stalking. The Stalking Resource Center envisions a future in which the criminal justice system and its many allied community partners will effectively collaborate and respond to stalking, improve victim safety and well-being, and hold offenders accountable. Visit us online at www.victimsofcrime.org/src. Contact us at 202-467-8700 or src@ncvc.org.
This document was developed under grant number 2008-TA-AX-K017 from the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) of the U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions and views expressed in this document are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice. For more information on the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women visit http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov

This document may be reproduced only in its entirety. Any alterations must be approved by the Stalking Resource Center

On-Air for WRIR and Blogging for the Pixel Project

I am excited to begin a couple new projects in my anti-violence work.

On December 9th, my first blog on Rape in War – a small article and a list of 16 resources that range from international organizations, documentaries, books, and news articles will appear on The Pixel Project Website – 16 for 16 Days of Activism.  I am proud to be part of the 16 for 16 Days of Activism to end violence against women.  I have spent the last 6 years focused on running a local rape crisis center and centered on response and direct education for a small regional community.  It was a great opportunity and learning element to turn my focus on sexual assault in the context of war and conflict.  When looking at rape in communities, families, and organizations; you become focused on the known predator of interpersonal crime and address the issue of sexual assault with a single survivor and family.  Sexual assault as a war crime brings home the link to larger issues of sexual assault as a part of society’s response to conflict.  The numbers of victims becomes a global number and is staggering, the extended families as secondary survivors is even more staggering when looked at as a group.  My research for this simple blog brought home the enormous amount of crime that accompanies war and conflict.  Crime that is overlooked or ignored.  The impact of trauma on the survivors, the families, and the community that will carry on is equally enormous and with the reduction of resources that happens in war, will be even more difficult to address and treat.   The impact of these crimes will continue even when peace is obtained.

My other project is going to be a weekly short spot on my local radio station WRIR  (Richmond Independent Radio).  I begin taping this weekend with the spots to be starting after the New Year.  I so look forward to sharing information on the social impact of interpersonal violence (sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence, dating violence, trafficking) that are at epidemic levels in our communities.  More to come!

 

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